EMC PowerPath vs MPIO – Take the High Road

Guest post by Mark Prahl

If you live in New England like I do, you have experienced some of the wettest weather on record in recent times. And, if you live in an old town like I do dating back to before the American Revolution, you know that some of those old paved paths can get flooded and become impassible when the rain comes.
Flooded road at Blackwater NWR

Photo by Leon Reed

Well, if you’re using one of those data path solutions native to an operating system or hypervisor you can expect some limitations to the paths at your disposal. Most use a basic method like round robin which distributes I/O among all available data paths in sequence because it considers all paths to be equal.

Now, just imagine your data paths are roads and you’re in the northeast like I am. What do you do when a road is underwater? Keep traveling over the same road because that’s all you can do. I think not.  You might eventually get to your destination if you’re lucky, but you’re just as likely to arrive late or not at all.

Well, the same goes for multipathing software.

Want to deliver a clear way for your customers?  Want to ensure the best performance?   Take the high road and get EMC PowerPath Multipathing. Right out of the box, PowerPath will automatically select the right optimized data path algorithm for your data center environment.

The Enterprise Strategy Group recently compared PowerPath Multipathing with Windows native MPIO and showed the performance advantages of PowerPath in Windows environments.  Results ranged from about 20% to over 200% better performance with PowerPath depending on the application.

But don’t take my word for it. Read the report yourself!

Mark Prahl is a high-tech business and marketing professional who has been running businesses and talking or writing about products and gadgets for business or personal consumption for some time. Currently, he is a member of the infrastructure management group at EMC crafting his own corner of the world to share thoughts about infrastructure management software and more. When not defining or promoting technology products, Mark can be found playing guitar around the greater Boston area with whomever may invite him up on stage.

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